The Outsiders Questions and Answers | Q & A | GradeSaver

 

the outsiders critical thinking questions

Essays for The Outsiders. The Outsiders essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of The Outsiders written by S. E. Hinton. Analysis of the American Reality, Possibility, and Dream found in "Nickel and Dimed" and "The Outsiders"Author: S. E. Hinton. Teaching critical thinking, though, isn’t always easy. The following are some ways to integrate critical thinking exercises into your ESL lessons while still meeting the language goals you set for your students. Try These 8 Critical Thinking Activities with Your ESL StudentsAuthor: Susan Verner. Living Texts: Analyzing S.E. Hinton's The Outsiders by Thinking, Reading, Acting, and Thinking Again is an adaptable, Humanities-based unit that provides opportunities for students to physically demonstrate their interpretations of S.E. Hinton's The Outsiders through improvisation. The underlayment of the classroom activities is personal and.


The outsiders critical thinking questions


To leave a general comment about our Web site, please click here. Your drawing reminds me of a line she used from Robert Frost, Nature's first green is goldand I am struggling to connect it all. I smiled, gave a sheepish negative nod and then, as if the metallic glow of Isaac's art had spoken— Illumination! I had brought to this viewing my own ideas, beginning to connect all of these things as if some meaning were to be made of the moment.

Isaac never intended to connect his art with Hinton's or Frost's, but my experience made it happen. Making meaning, in motion. I had solidified my understanding of the art of interpretation. All things are connected, both in life and in the the outsiders critical thinking questions of life called literature.

I experienced an example of how the reader brings his or her personal experience to a reading; how the author's intention drives a creation that is often ambiguous to the reader; and how what is simply sitting right before your eyes contains the whole—the actual words in the text—whether you 'get it' or not. See Appendices: A. Living Texts: Analyzing S. Hinton's The Outsiders by Thinking, Reading, Acting, and Thinking Again is an adaptable, Humanities-based unit that provides opportunities for students to physically demonstrate their interpretations of S.

Hinton's The Outsiders through improvisation. The underlayment of the classroom activities is personal and social responsibility. Included in this unit is a sequence that can be used by students to efficiently and effectively interpret a text. Both the interpretation strategies and the outsiders critical thinking questions improvisational strategies are used within a performance sequence that uses each chapter of the novel as the foundation.

Integrating these strategies will help students to interact with a text through visual, auditory, and kinesthetic means, thus accessing each student's learning modality. Use of improvisation will help students to physically, linguistically, and artistically put themselves in the shoes of other people charactersplaces settingsand problems plot in order to help them see, hear, and feel what is going on in the words of a text.

Throughout this unit, students will be able to analyze interpret The Outsiders for the text's meaning, the author's style, the student's personal experience, and the greater cultural setting; use these ideas to plan an interpretive performance; synthesize perform the plan; and evaluate the relationship between how a reader mentally interprets a text and how the actor the outsiders critical thinking questions and orally interprets a text as a form of action by substantiating claims and actions with a text.

This unit has been designed for middle-level gifted, or academically-inclined, students within the Humanities Department of the Pittsburgh Public Schools gifted education program. The students, though grouped by perceived intellectual strength, have a wide array of gifts and talents. They are not, contrary to popular assumption, 'all good students', nor do they all 'instinctively know everything'. They are also not capable of 'getting it all right on the first try'.

They really like to ask questions. A lot of questions. And though most students cherish their intellects, they struggle with the often negative reactions that others have to their unique perspectives. They also struggle to admit when they are struggling, the outsiders critical thinking questions, most likely because they have been culturally conditioned to be silent. Thus, each of the teachers in our program writes course materials suited to each student's specific academic need and interest, as determined by test scores.

As indicated above, teachers implement the upper tier of Bloom's Taxonomy together with interactive communication, problem solving, and the creative thinking process, to help develop self-directed learners through project-based course development. The students select from among these courses similarly to choosing multiple college electives, attending one minute session per choice each week over a course of 16 weeks.

In order to teach this unit, I need to answer several questions: What is interpretation? What is improvisation? How does interpretation relate to performance? The following material addresses these questions and includes examples of how they can be applied to Hinton's The Outsiders. The word interpretation is synonymous with the act of finding meaning.

But, the outsiders critical thinking questions, what is meant by meaning? How does one find meaning within a text and why does any of this matter, anyway? Teaching students how to interpret a complex text matters because the act of interpreting is a rigorous task, and rigorous tasks, according to the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Developmentare necessary to keep U. A top-down reading process, which includes moving from meaning and big ideas to details and language forms, is the most recently-accepted 'best practice'.

The pattern includes reading to get the gist; rereading to find significant moments; interpreting ideas within the text; and analyzing the author's methods. Students are encouraged to read each portion of a text at least four times. Adequate oral reading fluency, reading comprehension, and interpretive or critical analysis skills are not necessarily co-existent, even among high-ability readers.

In my classroom, such students often struggle with oral reading fluency and comprehension. They can quickly decode phonetics and memorize the meaning of new vocabulary when it is presented to them in isolation from a text, yet they often fail to find the contextual evidence needed to tackle an unknown word within a text. Furthermore, they fail to consider that one word, when repeated in the text or placed within several different texts, the outsiders critical thinking questions, may have a different meaning each time it appears.

This inability does not; however, preclude them from taking part in higher order thinking activities, such as interpreting a text. Such skills can be taught simultaneously. A line of questioning that moves systematically higher and higher on Bloom's Taxonomy can be used.

Consider what words are both significant and need to be defined in this portion of Hinton's novel:. How can a reader define the terms Soc and greaser?

One can simply pick up a dictionary and find a meaning for greaserbut one cannot do the same for Soc, the outsiders critical thinking questions.

In the case of Soc, the reader must move away from Bloom's level 1, knowledgeand move into level 4 and 5, otherwise known as the first two stages of higher order thinking, or analysis and synthesis. Analysis requires a student to "make inferences and find evidence to support generalizations" 5 and synthesis requires a student to "[c]ompile information together in a different way by combining elements in a new pattern. Students could be led to extrapolate a definition for the words through presentation of a question like, "What evidence the outsiders critical thinking questions you find that could lead you to a text-based definition of these words?

Being a Soc is more desirable, so it might mean the opposite the outsiders critical thinking questions those traits. A possible answer could be, 'The speaker must care about Darry.

He says he feels sorry that the gang holds them back, the outsiders critical thinking questions. Interpretation requires evidence. It also requires the reader to eliminate possibilities. This restriction is accomplished by conventions of relevance, or more formally, by selective contextualization, the outsiders critical thinking questions.

Alongside the ability to use clues to define new vocabulary, the students also have a hard time looking for significant portions of the text that can lead to an understanding of the text.

In a general manner of speaking, comprehension requires students to the outsiders critical thinking questions able to use clues from within the text to understand the text as a whole. Comprehension is on the lower order of Bloom's Taxonomy, yet it is an essential skill necessary for gaining a basic understanding of a text as a whole, the outsiders critical thinking questions. Taking a close look at significant sections of a text, like the one mentioned above, gives students the opportunity to practice comprehension skills.

To illustrate this, the outsiders critical thinking questions, reread the excerpt and connect it to the opening excerpt in the Overview. What can you now tell about the story? Since the characters in the first passage are referencing Robert The outsiders critical thinking questions, can you still maintain your belief in the definition of greaser as unintelligent? What might this suggest about the character's sense of self?

When these sorts of connection are made, the student is moving toward Bloom's highest level, evaluation. Evaluation is defined as the ability to "[p]resent and defend opinions by making judgments about information, validity of ideas or quality of work based on a set of criteria.

Like Bloom's Taxonomy, the components of interpretation vary in definition, but for purposes of this unit, I will follow Laurence Perrine and label the parts of interpretation as meaning, intention, and context. Interpretation the outsiders critical thinking questions to look critically at these parts as they the outsiders critical thinking questions to the overall text.

In order to arrive at a collective agreement about an author's intention, a reader must interact with the text in a critical manner. Goethe's three questions for "constructive criticism" of authorial intention are, "What did the author set out to do?

Was his plan reasonable and sensible, and how far did he succeed in carrying it out? Though it may seem that speculation would be a part of answering Goethe's first question, the question actually aims at objective interpretation—using text-based examples to arrive at the part-to-whole relationship of a text.

To illustrate this, re-read the excerpt above from The Outsiders. What do you notice about the defining words for the character groupings?

Why is it that Hinton chose to capitalize Soc and de-capitalize greaser? Did she intend to give the reader a hint? These questions lead to the concept of authorial intent. Intention has obvious affinities for the author's attitude toward his work, the way he felt, the outsiders critical thinking questions, what made him write.

It is not of concern when meaning is being made by the reader. Interpreting why an author made a particular choice is too subjective. Some conclusions are better substantiated than others, but for the purposes of this unit, that form of criticism will be left out because young readers need to find evidence. Both the writer and the reader of a text can be influenced by historical and cultural context.

If a reader is tackling a non-contemporary text, the reader must subtract the conclusions that are muddied by his own preconceptions and simply see the text either as it is, or the reader must consider the historical and cultural context in which the text was written. Consider that The Outsiders was published in Hinton was 15 years old when she wrote the draft. Audra Bull, a public school educator from Tulsa, perceives the actual area in which Hinton's book was set as still being eerily similar to the texture of the novel—divided by class.

Improvisation is a form of dramatization that is scriptless. An actor is given all or part of the who, where, and what just as the skit is beginning.

This aligns well with literature: character whosetting whereand plot what. Just as a reader creates meaning as he or the outsiders critical thinking questions reads, an improv-ist creates the outsiders critical thinking questions in motion. He or she creates the act during the performance. This stands in opposition to the way an actor would prepare for a scripted performance, such as predetermining a the outsiders critical thinking questions to portray the outsiders critical thinking questions character, while memorizing a script.

There is both freedom and restriction in improv, too, as an actor needs to eliminate, in the moment, what does not 'make sense' to the audience. Improv, like interpretation, is a continually renewing experience. Each reading of a text in interpretation can provide new insights and challenge or change ideas, as does each performance in improv.

 

Outsiders Reflection & Discussion Questions

 

the outsiders critical thinking questions

 

Living Texts: Analyzing S.E. Hinton's The Outsiders by Thinking, Reading, Acting, and Thinking Again is an adaptable, Humanities-based unit that provides opportunities for students to physically demonstrate their interpretations of S.E. Hinton's The Outsiders through improvisation. The underlayment of the classroom activities is personal and. Teaching critical thinking, though, isn’t always easy. The following are some ways to integrate critical thinking exercises into your ESL lessons while still meeting the language goals you set for your students. Try These 8 Critical Thinking Activities with Your ESL StudentsAuthor: Susan Verner. Jan 24,  · Outsiders Reflection IAfter reading the S.E. Hinton interview,please answerthe following questions in your notebook What are 5 facts about S.E Hinton that are important?2. What are 5 of S.E. Hinton influences as she wrote The Outsiders? Or, how did what was happening in the world of politics and society influence The Outsiders?3.